Motor fluctuations and dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: Clinical manifestations

@article{Jankovic2005MotorFA,
  title={Motor fluctuations and dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: Clinical manifestations},
  author={Joseph Jankovic},
  journal={Movement Disorders},
  year={2005},
  volume={20}
}
  • J. Jankovic
  • Published 1 May 2005
  • Medicine
  • Movement Disorders
Fluctuations in the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), such as wearing‐off and on–off effects, and dyskinesias are related to a variety of factors, including duration and dosage of levodopa, age at onset, stress, sleep, food intake, and other pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. The majority of patients, particularly those with young onset of PD, experience these levodopa‐related adverse effects after a few years of treatment. Assessment of these motor complications is difficult… 
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