Motivational biases in the attribution of responsibility for an accident: A meta-analysis of the defensive-attribution hypothesis.

@inproceedings{Burger1981MotivationalBI,
  title={Motivational biases in the attribution of responsibility for an accident: A meta-analysis of the defensive-attribution hypothesis.},
  author={Jerry M. Burger},
  year={1981}
}
Research concerned with motivational distortion in the attribution of responsibility for an accident is reviewed. The results of a statistical combination of 22 relevant studies suggest a statistically significant but weak tendency to attribute more responsibility to an accident perpetrator for a severe than for a mild accident. An examination of interacting variables found, consistent with Shaver's defensive-attribution hypothesis, that when observers were personally and situationally similar… CONTINUE READING

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