Motility in cyanobacteria: polysaccharide tracks and Type IV pilus motors

@article{Wilde2015MotilityIC,
  title={Motility in cyanobacteria: polysaccharide tracks and Type IV pilus motors},
  author={Annegret Wilde and Conrad W. Mullineaux},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={98}
}
Motility in cyanobacteria is useful for purposes that range from seeking out favourable light environments to establishing symbioses with plants and fungi. No known cyanobacterium is equipped with flagella, but a diverse range of species is able to ‘glide’ or ‘twitch’ across surfaces. Cyanobacteria with this capacity range from unicellular species to complex filamentous forms, including species such as Nostoc punctiforme, which can generate specialised motile filaments called hormogonia. Recent… 
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