Mothering and Mesmerism in the Life of Harriet Martineau

@article{Postlethwaite1989MotheringAM,
  title={Mothering and Mesmerism in the Life of Harriet Martineau},
  author={Diana Postlethwaite},
  journal={Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society},
  year={1989},
  volume={14},
  pages={583 - 609}
}
  • D. Postlethwaite
  • Published 1 April 1989
  • Art
  • Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society
On the surface, Harriet Martineau's life (1802-76) offers a radical challenge to the stereotype of the Victorian woman writer as a subjective, emotive novelist or poet, a Lady of Shalott weaving her web of words in isolation from the larger concerns of the masculine world. In a career that spanned fifty-five years, Martineau produced thirty-five books and scores of periodical essays. Well respected, earning her living by her pen, she moved freely and independently between London literary… 
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TOWARDS A GEOMETRY OF COMFORT: HARRIET MARTINEAU'S “I WAS OUTGROWING MY SHELL” AS POETICS OF SPACE
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References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES
Martineau died in the summer of 1848, shortly after Harriet had completed Household Education (n. 13 above). Mother and daughter did have a final meeting
    For an extended discussion of Martineau's conversion to mesmerism as it relates to her religious and philosophical thought, see Diana Postlethwaite
    • her Making It Whole: A Victorian Circle and the Shape of Their World
    • 1975
    Gilligan essentially rephrases Erikson's spatial metaphors. Women see human relationships as the "interconnections of the web," men see them in terms of "hierarchical relationships" (ibid., 49)
    • Martineau was to find her salvation in what Carol Gilligan calls "the ongoing process of attachment that creates and sustains the human community" (In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's Development
    • 1982