Mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 infection during exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of life: an intervention cohort study

@article{Coovadia2007MothertochildTO,
  title={Mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 infection during exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of life: an intervention cohort study},
  author={H. Coovadia and N. Rollins and R. Bland and K. Little and A. Coutsoudis and M. Bennish and M. Newell},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2007},
  volume={369},
  pages={1107-1116}
}
BACKGROUND Exclusive breastfeeding, though better than other forms of infant feeding and associated with improved child survival, is uncommon. We assessed the HIV-1 transmission risks and survival associated with exclusive breastfeeding and other types of infant feeding. METHODS 2722 HIV-infected and uninfected pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa (seven rural, one semiurban, and one urban), were enrolled into a non-randomised intervention cohort study… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
Both promotion of EBF and access to antiretroviral therapy contribute to lower HIV transmission in breastfed infants in low resource settings. Expand
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