Mother’s curse neutralizes natural selection against a human genetic disease over three centuries

@article{Milot2017MothersCN,
  title={Mother’s curse neutralizes natural selection against a human genetic disease over three centuries},
  author={Emmanuel Milot and Claudia Moreau and Alain Gagnon and Alan A. Cohen and Bernard Brais and Damian Labuda},
  journal={Nature Ecology \& Evolution},
  year={2017},
  volume={1},
  pages={1400-1406}
}
According to evolutionary theory, mitochondria could be poisoned gifts that mothers transmit to their sons. This is because mutations harmful to males are expected to accumulate in the mitochondrial genome, the so-called ‘mother’s curse’. However, the contribution of the mother’s curse to the mutation load in nature remains largely unknown and hard to predict, because compensatory mechanisms could impede the spread of deleterious mitochondria. Here we provide evidence for the mother’s curse in… 
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26 Evolutionary theory proposes that maternal inheritance of mitochondria will facilitate the 27 accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations that are harmful to males but benign 28 or
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