Mother’s curse and indirect genetic effects: Do males matter to mitochondrial genome evolution?

@article{Keaney2019MothersCA,
  title={Mother’s curse and indirect genetic effects: Do males matter to mitochondrial genome evolution?},
  author={Thomas A. Keaney and Heidi W. S. Wong and Damian K. Dowling and Ther{\'e}sa M. Jones and Luke Holman},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2019},
  volume={33},
  pages={189 - 201}
}
Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was originally thought to prevent any response to selection on male phenotypic variation attributable to mtDNA, resulting in a male‐biased mtDNA mutation load (“mother's curse”). However, the theory underpinning this claim implicitly assumes that a male's mtDNA has no effect on the fitness of females he comes into contact with. If such “mitochondrially encoded indirect genetics effects” (mtIGEs) do in fact exist, and there is relatedness between… 
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