Mosaic Morphology in the Thorax of Australopithecus sediba

@article{Schmid2013MosaicMI,
  title={Mosaic Morphology in the Thorax of Australopithecus sediba},
  author={P. Lennart Schmid and Steven Emilio Churchill and Shahed Nalla and Eveline Weissen and Kristian J. Carlson and Darryl J. de Ruiter and Lee R. Berger},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={340}
}
The shape of the thorax of early hominins has been a point of contention for more than 30 years. Owing to the generally fragmentary nature of fossil hominin ribs, few specimens have been recovered that have rib remains complete enough to allow accurate reassembly of thoracic shape, thus leaving open the question of when the cylindrical-shaped chest of humans and their immediate ancestors evolved. The ribs of Australopithecus sediba exhibit a mediolaterally narrow, ape-like upper thoracic shape… 
Mandibular Remains Support Taxonomic Validity of Australopithecus sediba
TLDR
The morphology of mandibular remains of Australopithecus sediba shows that it is not merely a late-surviving morph of Au.
The Upper Limb of Australopithecus sediba
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TLDR
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Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analyses show that Malapa Hominin 2's nearly complete middle lumbar vertebra is human-like in overall shape but its vertebral body is somewhat intermediate in shape between modern humans and great apes, indicating powerful trunk musculature.
A hominin first rib discovered at the Sterkfontein Caves, South Africa
TLDR
A partial first rib from Member 4 of the Sterkfontein Caves, South Africa is described and analyses show that South African Australopithecus share derived features of the proximal first rib more closely resembling A. afarensis and later hominins than great apes.
The vertebrae and ribs of Homo naledi.
New fossils of Australopithecus sediba reveal a nearly complete lower back
TLDR
3D GM analyses show that MH2’s nearly complete middle lumbar vertebra is human-like in shape but bears large, cranially-directed transverse processes, implying powerful trunk musculature, and interpret this combination of features to indicate that A. sediba used its lower back in both human- like bipedalism and ape-like arboreal positional behaviors.
The cervical spine of Australopithecus sediba.
Mandibular ramus shape of Australopithecus sediba suggests a single variable species.
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The well-preserved forelimb remains of 1.98-million-year-old Australopithecus sediba from Malapa, South Africa, contribute to understanding of this evolutionary transition from its use for both locomotion and prehension to a predominantly prehensile and manipulative role.
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