Mortality associated with carbapenem‐resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in liver transplant recipients

@article{Kalpoe2012MortalityAW,
  title={Mortality associated with carbapenem‐resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in liver transplant recipients},
  author={Jayant S. Kalpoe and Edith Sonnenberg and Stephanie H. Factor and Juan del Rio Mart{\'i}n and Thomas D Schiano and Gopi Patel and Shirish S Huprikar},
  journal={Liver Transplantation},
  year={2012},
  volume={18}
}
Resistant bacterial infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation (LT). This was a retrospective cohort study evaluating the outcomes associated with carbapenem‐resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) infections after LT. In a 2005‐2006 cohort of 175 consecutive LT recipients, 91 infection episodes were observed in 61 patients (35%). The mortality rate 1 year after LT was 18% (32/175). Enterococcus (43%) and Klebsiella species (37%) were the most… 

Mortality associated with carbapenem‐resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in liver transplant recipients

  • J. VargheseV. JayanthiM. Rela
  • Medicine, Biology
    Liver transplantation : official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society
  • 2012
The outcomes associated withCRKP infections in LT recipients are poor, and improved preventive strategies are needed to curtail the devastating impact of CRKP inLT recipients.

Risk factors and outcomes of carbapenem‐resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in liver transplant recipients

  • Marcus R. PereiraBrendan F. Scully E. Verna
  • Medicine, Biology
    Liver transplantation : official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society
  • 2015
In an endemic area, post‐LT CRKP infection is common, occurring in 6.6% of recipients, and is strongly associated with post-LT mortality, and improved strategies for screening and prevention are urgently needed.

Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae influences the outcome of early infections in liver transplant recipients

Overall, data indicate that early infections in LT patients are characterized by significant mortality, and an early infection caused by CRKP has an adverse impact on survival in these patients suggesting an urgent need for adopting preventive measures to avoiding this complication.

Effect of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection on the Clinical Outcomes of Kidney Transplant Recipients

It is possible that DDI can lead to CRP infection, and CRKP infection and pneumonia were closely correlated with poor prognosis, and the use of CZA may play a role in avoiding the unfavorable outcomes ofCRKP infected recipients.

Analysis of Risk Factors for Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection and Its Effect on the Outcome of Early Infection After Kidney Transplantation

The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that the one-year survival rate of patients infected with CRKP in the early postoperative stage was significantly lower than that of uninfected patients.

Risk Factors for Acquisition of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Mortality Among Abdominal Solid Organ Transplant Recipients with K. pneumoniae Infections

Great efforts are needed towards improved antibiotic administration, early diagnosis and precise treatment, recognition of septic shock, and reduced length of hospitalization in abdominal solid organ transplant recipients.

The evolving threat of carbapenem‐resistant infections after liver transplantation: The case of Acinetobacter baumannii

  • Marcus R. PereiraA. Uhlemann
  • Medicine, Biology
    Liver transplantation : official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society
  • 2016
There is compelling evidence that an additional organism, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB), is also associated with very high morbidity and mortality after LT, and a series of infection control measures resulted in the incidence of CRAB acquisition dropping from 12.2/1000 patient-days in 2009 to 5.5/ 1000 patient- days by 2014.

Risk Factors for Infection With Carbapenem‐Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae After Liver Transplantation: The Importance of Pre‐ and Posttransplant Colonization

  • M. GiannellaM. Bartoletti P. Viale
  • Medicine, Biology
    American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
  • 2015
A prospective cohort study of all adult patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) to define risk factors associated with carbapenem‐resistant‐Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR‐KP) infection, and developed a risk score that effectively discriminated patients at low versus higher risk for CR‐Kp infection.

Epidemiology and Molecular Characterization of Bacteremia Due to Carbapenem‐Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in Transplant Recipients

  • C. ClancyL. Chen M. Hong Nguyen
  • Medicine, Biology
    American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
  • 2013
We conducted a retrospective study of 17 transplant recipients with carbapenem‐resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia, and described epidemiology, clinical characteristics and strain genotypes.

Risk Factors and Outcomes of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Infection After Liver Transplantation: A Retrospective Study in a Chinese Population

CRE infections within 30 days post-LT were associated with worse outcomes, and intraoperative blood loss equal to or more than 1500 mL, CRE rectal carriage within 30 Days post- LT, biliary complications and renal replacement therapy for more than 3 days were independent risk factors of CRE infections after LT.
...

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