Mortality Patterns Suggest Lack of Senescence in Hydra

@article{Martnez1998MortalityPS,
  title={Mortality Patterns Suggest Lack of Senescence in Hydra},
  author={Daniel E. Mart{\'i}nez},
  journal={Experimental Gerontology},
  year={1998},
  volume={33},
  pages={217-225}
}
  • D. Martínez
  • Published 1998
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Experimental Gerontology
Senescence, a deteriorative process that increases the probability of death of an organism with increasing chronological age, has been found in all metazoans where careful studies have been carried out. [...] Key Method To test for the presence or absence of aging in hydra, mortality and reproductive rates for three hydra cohorts have been analyzed for a period of four years. The results provide no evidence for aging in hydra: mortality rates have remained extremely low and there are no apparent signs of…Expand
Declining asexual reproduction is suggestive of senescence in hydra: Comment on Martinez, D., “Mortality patterns suggest lack of senescence in hydra.” Exp Gerontol 33, 217–25
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