Morphs, Dispersal Behavior, Genetic Similarity, and the Evolution of Cooperation

@article{Sinervo2003MorphsDB,
  title={Morphs, Dispersal Behavior, Genetic Similarity, and the Evolution of Cooperation},
  author={Barry R. Sinervo and Jean Clobert},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={300},
  pages={1949 - 1951}
}
Genetic similarity owing to kin relationship is often invoked to explain the evolution of social cooperation. In this study, male color morphs of side-blotched lizards settle nonrandomly with respect to genetic similarity. Blue morphs tend to settle in close proximity to other blue morphs with high genetic similarity. Blue neighbors have three times the average fitness of blue males lacking such neighbors. Conversely, genetically similar males depress fitness of the orange morph. Moreover… 
Co-evolution of dispersal with social behaviour favours social polymorphism
TLDR
This model of co-evolution of dispersal and social behaviour shows that it readily leads to the emergence and maintenance of two broadly-defined social morphs: a sessile, benevolent morph expressed by individuals who tend to increase the fecundity of others within their group relative to their own; and a dispersive, self-serving morph.
Space use and genetic structure do not maintain color polymorphism in a species with alternative behavioral strategies
TLDR
The results indicate potential weak barriers to gene flow between some morphs, potentially due to nonrandom pre‐ or postcopulatory mate choice or postzygotic genetic incompatibilities, but space use, spatial structure, and nonrandom mating do not appear to be primary mechanisms maintaining color polymorphism in this system, highlighting the complexity and variation in alternative strategies associated withcolor polymorphism.
Color-Biased Dispersal Inferred by Fine-Scale Genetic Spatial Autocorrelation in a Color Polymorphic Salamander
TLDR
Results show that genetic methods typically used for sex-biased dispersal can be used to investigate differences in dispersal between morphs that vary discretely in polymorphic populations, such as color morphs.
Morph-dependent resource acquisition and fitness in a polymorphic bird
TLDR
Investigation of red and black head-colour morphs of the Gouldian finch found competitive asymmetries are important to relative selection among coexisting morphs, and are likely to contribute to the maintenance of alternative sympatric colour-morphs in wild populations.
Cooperation‐mediated plasticity in dispersal and colonization
TLDR
The experimental results should help to resolve the evolutionary conflict between cooperation and dispersal: cooperative individuals are expected to avoid kin‐competition by dispersing long distances, but maintain the benefits of cooperation by dispersed in small groups.
Kin-dependent dispersal influences relatedness and genetic structuring in a lek system
TLDR
The results indicate that kin-dependent dispersal decisions and costs are factors driving the evolution of cooperative courtship and have a genetic footprint in wild populations.
Environment, but not genetic divergence, influences geographic variation in colour morph frequencies in a lizard
TLDR
Spatial variation in selection appears to play an important role in shaping morph frequency patterns in C. decresii, and selection associated with differences in local environmental conditions, combined with relatively low levels of gene flow, is expected to favour population divergence in morph composition, but may be counteracted by negative frequency-dependent selection favouring rare morphs.
Density and genetic relatedness increase dispersal distance in a subsocial organism.
TLDR
It is found that both density and relatedness in the release patch increase dispersal distance and is the first experimental demonstration that kin competition can shape the whole distribution of dispersal distances in a population, and thus affect the geographical spread of disperseal phenotypes.
Self-recognition, color signals, and cycles of greenbeard mutualism and altruism.
TLDR
It is shown that payoffs of cooperation depend on asymmetric costs of orange neighbors, and recognition and cooperation arise from genome-wide factors based on the mapping study of the location of genes responsible for self-recognition behavior, recognition of blue color, and the color locus.
The social evolution of dispersal with public goods cooperation
TLDR
It is found both mathematically and experimentally that dispersal is always favoured when averagePatch occupancy is low, but when average patch occupancy is high, the presence of public goods cheats greatly alters selection for dispersal.
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