Morphology of the Nasal Capsule of Primates—With Special Reference to Daubentonia and Homo

@article{Maier2014MorphologyOT,
  title={Morphology of the Nasal Capsule of Primates—With Special Reference to Daubentonia and Homo},
  author={Wolfgang Maier and Irina Ruf},
  journal={The Anatomical Record},
  year={2014},
  volume={297}
}
  • W. Maier, I. Ruf
  • Published 1 November 2014
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The Anatomical Record
Primitive mammals are considered macrosmatic. They have very large and complicated nasal capsules, nasal cavities with extensive olfactory epithelia, and relatively large olfactory bulbs. The complicated structures of the nasal capsule follow a relatively conservative “bauplan,” which is normally easy to see in earlier fetal stages; especially in altricial taxa it differentiates well into postnatal life. As anteriormost part of the chondrocranium, the nasal capsule is at first cartilaginous… 
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