Morphology of arbuscular mycorrhizas is influenced by fungal identity

@article{Cavagnaro2001MorphologyOA,
  title={Morphology of arbuscular mycorrhizas is influenced by fungal identity},
  author={T. Cavagnaro and L-L. Gao and F. A. Smith and Sally E. Smith},
  journal={New Phytologist},
  year={2001},
  volume={151},
  pages={469-475}
}
Summary • There are two main morphological types of arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM), the Arum-type and the Paris-type. It is often accepted that AM morphology is controlled by plant identity. • In this experiment the influence of fungal identity on the morphology of AM was investigated. Wild-type (76R) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) was grown in association with six different AM fungal species in nurse pots. The morphology of the AM was assessed quantitatively using the magnified intersects… Expand
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Host root cell packing does not appear to influence AM morphotype at least in the samples in this study, and the applicability of a current model is assessed. Expand
Cooccurring plants forming distinct arbuscular mycorrhizal morphologies harbor similar AM fungal species
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The detection of the same AM fungal species in field-collected roots of H. rhombea and R. parvifolius, which form Paris- and Arum-type AM, shows that AM morphology in these plants is strongly influenced by the host plant genotypes, as appears to be the case in many plant species in natural ecosystems. Expand
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TLDR
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OCCURRENCE AND MORPHOLOGY OF ENDORHIZAL FUNGI IN CROP SPECIES
We surveyed 45 crop species in 39 genera of 21 families to explore the incidence and morphology of endorhizal fungal associations in roots. The survey indicated that 42 of the 45 crop speciesExpand
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