Morphology of Australopithecus anamensis from Kanapoi and Allia Bay, Kenya.

@article{Ward2001MorphologyOA,
  title={Morphology of Australopithecus anamensis from Kanapoi and Allia Bay, Kenya.},
  author={Carol V. Ward and Meave G. Leakey and Alan W. Walker},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2001},
  volume={41 4},
  pages={
          255-368
        }
}
The hominid species Australopithecus anamensis was originally described in 1995, with new specimens and more secure dates given in 1998. [...] Key Result The A. anamensis holotype mandible was found at Kanapoi, as were most of the paratypes. The Allia Bay sample is less well represented, and does not preserve many anatomical elements diagnostic of this species. Still, the Allia Bay sample most closely resembles that from Kanapoi, and we suggest that for the time being it be retained as A. anamensis.Expand
Was Australopithecus anamensis ancestral to A. afarensis? A case of anagenesis in the hominin fossil record.
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A phylogenetic analysis of four temporally successive fossil samples assigned to these species using polarized character-state data from 20 morphological characters of the dentition and jaws supports the idea that the A. anamensis and A. afarensis samples represent parts of an anagenetically evolving lineage, or evolutionary species. Expand
The environments of Australopithecus anamensis at Allia Bay, Kenya: A multiproxy analysis of early Pliocene Bovidae.
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Dietary reconstructions based on stable isotopes, mesowear, and hypsodonty reveal that these bovids' diet encompassed the full C3 to C4 dietary spectrum and overlap in the two data sets, allowing reconstructions of the paleoenvironments of A. anamensis to be extended to Allia Bay, where this pivotal hominin species is associated with heterogeneous settings. Expand
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New fossils from the Middle Awash study area that extend the known Au. Expand
New fossils of Australopithecus anamensis from Kanapoi, West Turkana, Kenya (2003-2008).
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Nine new Kanapoi hominin fossils support the observation that canine crown height, morphology, root size and dimorphism were not altered from a primitive ape-like condition as part of a single event in human evolution, and that there may have been an adaptive difference in canine function between A. anamensis and A.afarensis. Expand
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18 new fossils attributable to Australopithecus anamensis are yielded, including the second maxillary fragment known from a Kanapoi hominin and the first from a relatively young adult, and two new complete sets of mandibular incisors are notably large. Expand
Proboscidea from Kanapoi, Kenya.
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Variation in feeding preferences among Kanapoi proboscideans corresponds to evidence for habitat heterogeny, including inferred substantial presence of grasses; the occurrence of multiple megaherbivores may have contributed to the fragmentation of ecosystems, positively affecting early hominin success and aiding diversification of other ungulate groups. Expand
The ecology of Australopithecus anamensis in the early Pliocene of Kanapoi, Kenya.
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Various measures of abundance indicate that A. anamensis was an important component of the Kanapoi early Pliocene ecosystems, and that its key adaptations allowed this species to thrive in complex and dynamic landscapes. Expand
Cercopithecid fossils from Kanapoi, West Turkana, Kenya (2007-2015).
TLDR
The presence of Theropithecus is consistent with the presence of some relatively open habitat at Kanapoi, and the ecological preferences of the small cercopithecin are unknown, most guenons are associated with relatively wooded habitats, as are most colobines, suggesting the availability of at least some wooded areas. Expand
New hominid fossils from Woranso-Mille (Central Afar, Ethiopia) and taxonomy of early Australopithecus.
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The Woranso-Mille hominids cannot be unequivocally assigned to either taxon due to their dental morphological intermediacy, but could be an indication that the Kanapoi, Allia Bay, and Asa Issie Au. Expand
New postcranial fossils of Australopithecus afarensis from Hadar, Ethiopia (1990-2007).
TLDR
Renewed fieldwork at Hadar, Ethiopia, by a team based at the Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University, resulted in the recovery of 49 new postcranial fossils attributed to Australopithecus afarensis, supporting the hypothesis that a single dimorphic species is represented. Expand
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