Morphology and histochemistry of the hyolingual apparatus in chameleons

@article{Herrel2001MorphologyAH,
  title={Morphology and histochemistry of the hyolingual apparatus in chameleons},
  author={Anthony Herrel and Jay J. Meyers and Kiisa C. Nishikawa and Frits de Vree},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2001},
  volume={249}
}
We reexamined the morphological and functional properties of the hyoid, the tongue pad, and hyolingual musculature in chameleons. Dissections and histological sections indicated the presence of five distinctly individualized pairs of intrinsic tongue muscles. An analysis of the histochemical properties of the system revealed only two fiber types in the hyolingual muscles: fast glycolytic and fast oxidative glycolytic fibers. In accordance with this observation, motor‐endplate staining showed… Expand
Lingual structural pattern of juvenile Chameleon, Chameleo chameleon
TLDR
The authors concluded that the juvenile stages of common chameleon exhibited striking cartilaginous inner compartment of the med-tongue and glandular fore-Tongue adapted for capturing prey coincides with high proliferated activities and presence of different kinds of non-keratinized lingual papillae. Expand
he scaling of tongue projection in the veiled chameleon , Chamaeleo alyptratus
Within a year of hatching, chameleons can grow by up to two orders of magnitude in body mass. Rapid growth of the feeding mechanism means that bones, muscles, and movements change as chameleons growExpand
The scaling of tongue projection in the veiled chameleon, Chamaeleo calyptratus.
TLDR
The discrepancy between the scaling of cross-sectional areas versus movements suggests changes in the energy storage and release mechanisms implicated in tongue projection in the veiled chameleon, Chamaeleo calyptratus. Expand
Comparative functional analysis of the hyolingual anatomy in lacertid lizards.
TLDR
The data show a subdivision between the fore- and hind-tongue in both papillary structure and muscular anatomy likely allowing these animals to use their tongues effectively during both chemoreception and prey transport in lacertid lizards. Expand
Morphology and fibre‐type distribution in the tongue of the Pogona vitticeps lizard (Iguania, Agamidae)
TLDR
The data confirm that specialisation toward a diet which includes more vegetal materials is associated with significant changes in tongue morphology and function and provide a way to compare fibre‐types and composition in all iguanian and scleroglossan lizards that use tongue prehension to catch prey. Expand
Functional relationships in the jaw apparatus of the chameleons and the evolution of adaptive complexes
TLDR
The formation of a specialized mechanism for prey capture by the tongue played a role of a key innovation in the phylogeny of chameleons and the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the formation of correlation and coordination interrelations in the organism are considered. Expand
Comparative study of the innervation patterns of the hyobranchial musculature in three iguanian lizards: Sceloporus undulatus, Pseudotrapelus sinaitus, and Chamaeleo jacksonii
TLDR
A comparison of the hyobranchial innervation patterns revealed a relatively conserved innervation pattern in S. undulatus and P. sinaitus, and a modified version of this basic layout in C. jacksonii, suggesting that feedback may be important in coordinating tongue, jaw, and hyoid movements. Expand
Comparative Anatomical, Histological and Histochemical Study of Tongue in Two Species of Insectivorous Vertebrates
TLDR
The tongue compounds of T.vittata are more appropriate to feeding manner on insects from that of H. auritus and contain a number of taste buds. Expand
Functional implications of supercontracting muscle in the chameleon tongue retractors.
TLDR
It is suggested that the chameleon tongue retractor muscles may have evolved supercontractile properties to enable a substantial force to be produced over a wide range of tongue projection distances in their complex three-dimensional habitat. Expand
Are Morphological Specializations of the Hyolingual System in Chameleons and Salamanders Tuned to Demands on Performance?*
TLDR
Interestingly, the data show that at least in chameleons, the extreme design of the tongue in function of prey capture appears to have consequences on prey transport, resulting in an increased dependence on the hyoid. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 69 REFERENCES
Tongue structure and function in Oplurus cuvieri (reptilia: Iguanidae)
TLDR
The intrinsic morphology of the tongue is rather similar to that previously described for iguanids, but fibers of M. verticalis encircles ventrally the lingual process could act in tongue protrusion as previously suggested for agamids. Expand
Histochennical properties of some jaw muscles of the lizard Tupinambis nigropunctatus (teiidae)
TLDR
To determine if similar compartmentalization exists in jaw muscles of the teiid lizard Tupinambis nigropunctatus, nine jaw muscles from two adults and one juvenile were examined and serial sections from each muscle were analyzed using histochemical techniques to indicate relative contractile, oxidative, and glycolytic capacities. Expand
Papillary morphology of the tongue of the American chameleon: Anolis carolinensis
TLDR
The plumose papillae and their retinue of plume cells are unique morphological structures that may be important in mastication and deglutition of food. Expand
Why the chameleon has spiral-shaped muscle fibres in its tongue
TLDR
A quantitative model of the accelerator muscle was developed that predicts internal muscle fibre arrangements based on the functional requirements above and the physical principle of mechanical stability, and the curved shapes and orientations of the muscle fibres typically found in the accelerator Muscle were accurately predicted. Expand
The Mechanism of Tongue Projection in Chameleons: I. Electromyographic Tests of Functional Hypotheses
TLDR
The major implications of these results for models of the chameleon feeding mechanism are that the hyoglossi do not act to hold the tongue on the entoglossal process during a loading period prior to tongue projection, and that the presence of 185 ms of intense activity in the accelerator muscle prior to tongues projection suggests the presenceOf a preloading mechanism, the nature of which is the subject of the companion paper. Expand
Histochemical and Ultrastructural Features of the Biceps Brachii of the African Chameleon (Chamaeleo senegalensis)
TLDR
Characteristics of reptilian muscle fibres were investigated in the biceps brachii of the African chameleon, Chamaeleo senegalensis, which had fibrils that were not clearly separated from each other and the sarcoplasmic reticulum was poorly developed. Expand
Comparative study of tongue protrusion in three iguanian lizards, Sceloporus undulatus, Pseudotrapelus sinaitus and Chamaeleo jacksonii.
TLDR
The combined results of these treatments suggest that these three groups represent transitional forms, both morphologically and functionally, in the development of a projectile tongue in iguanian lizards. Expand
Kinematics of Tongue Projection in Chamaeleo Oustaleti
TLDR
The kinematics of prey capture by the chamaeleonid lizard Chamaeleo oustaleti were studied using high-speed cinematography and it is proposed that this assists the accelerator muscle in powering tongue projection. Expand
The Mechanism of Tongue Projection in Chameleons: II. Role of Shape Change in a Muscular Hydrostat
In this paper we investigate the interaction between the accelerator muscle (the muscle that powers tongue projection) and the entoglossal process (the tongue's skeletal support) that occurs duringExpand
Tongues, tentacles and trunks: the biomechanics of movement in muscular‐hydrostats
TLDR
The means by which muscular-hydrostats produce elongation, shortening, bending and torsion are discussed. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...