Morphological and Neurological Contributions to Increased Strength

@article{Folland2007MorphologicalAN,
  title={Morphological and Neurological Contributions to Increased Strength},
  author={Jonathan P. Folland and Alun G. Williams},
  journal={Sports Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={37},
  pages={145-168}
}
AbstractHigh-resistance strength training (HRST) is one of the most widely practiced forms of physical activity, which is used to enhance athletic performance, augment musculo-skeletal health and alter body aesthetics. Chronic exposure to this type of activity produces marked increases in muscular strength, which are attributed to a range of neurological and morphological adaptations. This review assesses the evidence for these adaptations, their interplay and contribution to enhanced strength… 
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