• Corpus ID: 90628397

Morphological Correlates of Locomotor Performance in Four Species of Lizards Using Different Habitats

@article{Weiguo2005MorphologicalCO,
  title={Morphological Correlates of Locomotor Performance in Four Species of Lizards Using Different Habitats},
  author={Du Wei-guo and Lin Chi-xian and Shou Ci Lu and Ji Xiang},
  journal={Zoological Research},
  year={2005},
  volume={26},
  pages={41-46}
}
We used four species of lizards (Eumeces chinensis,Takydromus septentrionalis,Eremias brenchleyi and Calotes versicolor) that use different habitats as the experimental models to study variation in locomotor performance resulting from inter-specific differences in morphological traits.The sequence of body size measuring by snout-vent length (SVL) was E.chinensis (a ground-dwelling lizard)>C.versicolor (an arboreal lizard)>T.septentrionalis (a grass-dwelling lizard)>E.brenchleyi (a saxicolous… 
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Four functional categories are denned to embrace the range of locomotor diversity of aquatic vertebrates; (1) body/caudal fin (BCF) periodic propulsion where locomotor movements repeat, as occurs in