Morphological Adaptations to Nectarivory of the Alimentary Tract of the Swift Parrot Lathamus discolor

@article{Gartrell2000MorphologicalAT,
  title={Morphological Adaptations to Nectarivory of the Alimentary Tract of the Swift Parrot Lathamus discolor},
  author={Brett D Gartrell and Sandra C Jones and Raymond N. Brereton and Lee B. Astheimer},
  journal={Emu - Austral Ornithology},
  year={2000},
  volume={100},
  pages={274 - 279}
}
Summary The morphology and microscopic architecture of the alimentary tract of the Swift Parrot was compared to that of the Green Rosella and Musk Lorikeet. Gut contents were evaluated grossly and by light microscopic examination. There were significant differences between the Swift Parrot and the Green Rosella in the scaled measurements of the length of the distal oesophagus and proventriculus and in the width of the crop, duodenum, intestine and cloaca. There were significant differences in… Expand
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