More than just another face in the crowd: superior detection of threatening facial expressions in children and adults.

@article{Lobue2009MoreTJ,
  title={More than just another face in the crowd: superior detection of threatening facial expressions in children and adults.},
  author={Vanessa Lobue},
  journal={Developmental science},
  year={2009},
  volume={12 2},
  pages={
          305-13
        }
}
  • Vanessa Lobue
  • Published 1 March 2009
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Developmental science
Threatening facial expressions can signal the approach of someone or something potentially dangerous. Past research has established that adults have an attentional bias for angry faces, visually detecting their presence more quickly than happy or neutral faces. Two new findings are reported here. First, evidence is presented that young children share this attentional bias. In five experiments, young children and adults were asked to find a picture of a target face among an array of eight… 

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