Corpus ID: 18479796

More than an Urban Legend: The long-term socioeconomic effects of unplanned fertility shocks

@inproceedings{Fetzer2016MoreTA,
  title={More than an Urban Legend: The long-term socioeconomic effects of unplanned fertility shocks},
  author={T. Fetzer and Oliver Pardo and Amar Shanghavi},
  year={2016}
}
This paper exploits a nearly year-long period of power rationing that took place in Colombia in 1992, to shed light on three interrelated questions. First, we show that power shortages can lead to higher fertility, causing mini baby booms. Second, we show that the increase in fertility had not been offset by having fewer children over the following 12 years. Third, we show that the fertility shock caused mothers worse socioeconomic outcomes 12 years later. Taken together, the results suggest… Expand
8 Citations

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