More may be better: evidence of a negative relationship between physician supply and hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions.

@article{Laditka2005MoreMB,
  title={More may be better: evidence of a negative relationship between physician supply and hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions.},
  author={James N. Laditka and Sarah B Laditka and Janice C. Probst},
  journal={Health services research},
  year={2005},
  volume={40 4},
  pages={
          1148-66
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To conduct an empirical test of the relationship between physician supply and hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSH). DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING A data set of county ACSH rates compiled by the Safety Net Monitoring Initiative of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The analytical data set consists of 642 urban counties and 306 rural counties. We supplemented the AHRQ data with data from the Area Resource File and the Environmental… Expand
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TLDR
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The magnitude, variation, and determinants of rural hospital resource utilization associated with hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions.
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