More Lessons from the Hadza about Men’s Work

@article{Hawkes2014MoreLF,
  title={More Lessons from the Hadza about Men’s Work},
  author={Kristen Hawkes and James F. O'connell and Nicholas G. Blurton Jones},
  journal={Human Nature},
  year={2014},
  volume={25},
  pages={596-619}
}
Unlike other primate males, men invest substantial effort in producing food that is consumed by others. The Hunting Hypothesis proposes this pattern evolved in early Homo when ancestral mothers began relying on their mates’ hunting to provision dependent offspring. Evidence for this idea comes from hunter-gatherer ethnography, but data we collected in the 1980s among East African Hadza do not support it. There, men targeted big game to the near exclusion of other prey even though they were… 
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