Morbidity of insured Swedish cats during 1999–2006 by age, breed, sex, and diagnosis

@article{Egenvall2010MorbidityOI,
  title={Morbidity of insured Swedish cats during 1999–2006 by age, breed, sex, and diagnosis},
  author={Agneta Egenvall and Brenda N. Bonnett and Jens H{\"a}ggstr{\"o}m and Bodil Str{\"o}m Holst and Lotta M{\"o}ller and Ane N{\o}dtvedt},
  journal={Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery},
  year={2010},
  volume={12},
  pages={948 - 959}
}
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The present study provides information of incidence and probability of developing pyometra based on age, breed, and urban or rural geographical location that may be useful for designing cat breeding programs in high-risk breeds and for future studies of the genetic background of the disease.
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TLDR
Using crossbreeds as the reference breed, Abyssinian cats had the highest odds of having urinary disorders with a ratio of 1.40 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–1.35), followed by Norwegian Forest Cats and Somalis.
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TLDR
Primary-care veterinary clinical data within the VetCompass project was versatile and useful for demographic and clinical feline studies and Veterinarians could use these results to focus their diagnostic and prophylactic efforts towards the most prevalent feline disorders.
Epidemiological study of feline idiopathic cystitis in Seoul, South Korea
TLDR
It is suggested that the cat’s physical and social environment may play a role in the development of feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC) in cats living in a primarily indoor environment.
Mortality due to trauma in cats attending veterinary practices in central and south‐east England
TLDR
Findings highlight that veterinary advice which aims to reduce the likelihood of death through trauma, and specifically road traffic accidents, should focus on demographic attributes including age, and all geographical locations should be considered as of equal risk.
A retrospective study of feline trauma patients admitted to a referral centre
TLDR
Retrospective analysis of case records for 185 cats presented as emergency trauma cases to a referral hospital between February 2009 and December 2013 found cats involved in road traffic accidents and that present with signs of shock or multiple injuries following a traumatic event have an increased mortality rate.
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Evaluated the potential usefulness of the database maintained by the Swedish insurance company Agria for providing disease statistics on Swedish horses to produce estimates of relative risk adjusted for other factors in the model.
Mortality of Life‐Insured Swedish Cats during 1999–2006: Age, Breed, Sex, and Diagnosis
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Overall and breed‐specific survival increased with time when analyzed by 2‐year periods and the increase in survival over time is likely a reflection of willingness to keep pet cats longer and increased access to and sophistication of veterinary care.
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