Moral Distress, Compassion Fatigue, and Perceptions About Medication Errors in Certified Critical Care Nurses

@article{Maiden2011MoralDC,
  title={Moral Distress, Compassion Fatigue, and Perceptions About Medication Errors in Certified Critical Care Nurses},
  author={Jeanne M. Maiden and Jane M Georges and Cynthia D. Connelly},
  journal={Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing},
  year={2011},
  volume={30},
  pages={339-345}
}
The primary purpose of this study was to examine the previously untested relationships between moral distress, compassion fatigue, perceptions about medication errors, and nurse characteristics in a national sample of 205 certified critical care nurses. In addition, this study included a qualitative exploration of the phenomenon of medication errors in a smaller subset of certified critical care nurses. Results revealed statistically significant correlations between moral distress, compassion… 
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