• Corpus ID: 170478869

Monotheism and christology in I Corinthians 8. 4-6

@inproceedings{Rainbow1987MonotheismAC,
  title={Monotheism and christology in I Corinthians 8. 4-6},
  author={Paul A. Rainbow},
  year={1987}
}
The thesis is a description of the relationship between the 'one God, the Father' and the 'one Lord, Jesus Christ' in I Cor. 8. 4-6. It analyses Paul's language about God and Christ against the background of contemporary Jewish language about the one God, making use of methodic concepts gleaned eclectically from the structural movement in linguistics and the social sciences. Accordingly, the study falls into two parts: a determination of Paul's Jewish monotheistic presuppositions, and an… 
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