Monophyly of the Falconiformes Based on Syringeal Morphology

@article{Griffiths1994MonophylyOT,
  title={Monophyly of the Falconiformes Based on Syringeal Morphology},
  author={Carole S. Griffiths},
  journal={The Auk},
  year={1994},
  volume={111},
  pages={787-805}
}
ABSTRACr.-The systematic relationships of the diurnal birds of prey (Falconiformes) are unresolved. The monophyly of the order has not been established, and the relationships of the families within the order and of genera within the three polytypic families are unclear. To derive a phylogeny for the order and to assess the usefulness of the syrinx for resolving the systematics of nonpasserines, I analyzed variation in syringeal morphology of genera within each of the currently recognized… 

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