Monogamy in large bee societies: a stingless paradox

@article{Jaff2014MonogamyIL,
  title={Monogamy in large bee societies: a stingless paradox},
  author={R. Jaff{\'e} and F. C. Pioker-Hara and C. F. Santos and L. R. Santiago and D. A. Alves and Astrid M. P. Kleinert and T. M. Francoy and M. C. Arias and V. Imperatriz-Fonseca},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2014},
  volume={101},
  pages={261-264}
}
High genetic diversity is important for the functioning of large insect societies. Across the social Hymenoptera (ants, bees, and wasps), species with the largest colonies tend to have a high colony-level genetic diversity resulting from multiple queens (polygyny) or queens that mate with multiple males (polyandry). Here we studied the genetic structure of Trigona spinipes, a stingless bee species with colonies an order of magnitude larger than those of polyandrous honeybees. Genotypes of adult… Expand
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