Monogamy in Mammals

@article{Kleiman1977MonogamyIM,
  title={Monogamy in Mammals},
  author={Devra G. Kleiman},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={1977},
  volume={52},
  pages={39 - 69}
}
  • D. Kleiman
  • Published 1 March 1977
  • Biology
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
This review considers the behavioral, ecological, and reproductive characteristics of mammals exhibiting monogamy, i.e., mating exclusivity. From a discussion of the life histories of selected species of monogamous primates, carnivores, rodents and ungulates, several trends emerge. Two forms of monogramy occur, Type I, facultative, and Type II, obligate. The selective pressures leading to these two forms of monogamy may have been different. Facultative monogamy may result when a species exists… 
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