Monogamous sperm storage and permanent worker sterility in a long-lived ambrosia beetle

@article{Smith2018MonogamousSS,
  title={Monogamous sperm storage and permanent worker sterility in a long-lived ambrosia beetle},
  author={Shannon M. Smith and Deborah S. Kent and Jacobus J. Boomsma and Adam J. Stow},
  journal={Nature Ecology \& Evolution},
  year={2018},
  volume={2},
  pages={1009-1018}
}
The lifetime monogamy hypothesis claims that the evolution of permanently unmated worker castes always requires maximal full-sibling relatedness to be established first. The long-lived diploid ambrosia beetle Austroplatypus incompertus (Schedl) is known to be highly social, but whether it has lifetime sterile castes has remained unclear. Here we show that the gallery systems of this beetle inside the heartwood of live Eucalyptus trees are always inhabited by a single core family, consisting of… 
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This work was supported by a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Doctoral training studentship to R.A.B.
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