Monitoring with Head-Mounted Displays in General Anesthesia: A Clinical Evaluation in the Operating Room

@article{Liu2010MonitoringWH,
  title={Monitoring with Head-Mounted Displays in General Anesthesia: A Clinical Evaluation in the Operating Room},
  author={David Liu and Simon A. Jenkins and Penelope M. Sanderson and Perry Fabian and W. John Russell},
  journal={Anesthesia \& Analgesia},
  year={2010},
  volume={110},
  pages={1032–1038}
}
BACKGROUND:Patient monitors in the operating room are often positioned where it is difficult for the anesthesiologist to see them when performing procedures. Head-mounted displays (HMDs) can help anesthesiologists by superimposing a display of the patient's vital signs over the anesthesiologist's field of view. Simulator studies indicate that by using an HMD, anesthesiologists can spend more time looking at the patient and less at the monitors. We performed a clinical evaluation testing whether… Expand
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