Monitoring of transiting exoplanets and their host stars with small aperture telescopes

@inproceedings{MASalisbury2020MonitoringOT,
  title={Monitoring of transiting exoplanets and their host stars with small aperture telescopes},
  author={M.A.Salisbury and U.C.Kolb and A.J.Norton and C.A.Haswell},
  year={2020}
}
  • M.A.Salisbury, U.C.Kolb, +1 author C.A.Haswell
  • Published 2020
  • Physics
  • Exoplanet research is now target rich with a wide diversity of systems making it difficult for high demand observatories to undertake follow up observations over extended periods of time. We investigate the effectiveness of using 0.4mclass telescopes for monitoring transiting hot Jupiters and their host stars. We consider two representative case studies: WASP-52b with 13 new transits, and HAT-P-23b with 17 new transits and concurrent photometric monitoring covering 78 days. We present updated… CONTINUE READING

    Figures and Tables from this paper

    References

    SHOWING 1-10 OF 48 REFERENCES
    Departure from the constant-period ephemeris for the transiting exoplanet WASP-12 b
    • 45
    • Highly Influential
    • PDF
    Starspot Occultations in Infrared Transit Spectroscopy: The Case of WASP-52b
    • 13
    • Highly Influential
    • PDF
    Homogeneously derived transit timings for 17 exoplanets and reassessed TTV trends for WASP-12 and WASP-4
    • 12
    • Highly Influential
    • PDF
    How do starspots influence the transit timing variations of exoplanets? Simulations of individual and consecutive transits
    • 15
    • Highly Influential
    • PDF
    Orbital alignment and star-spot properties in the WASP-52 planetary system
    • 23
    • PDF
    Orbital period variations of hot Jupiters caused by the Applegate effect
    • 37
    • Highly Influential
    • PDF