Molecular regionalization in the compact brain of the meiofaunal annelid Dinophilus gyrociliatus (Dinophilidae)

@article{Kerbl2016MolecularRI,
  title={Molecular regionalization in the compact brain of the meiofaunal annelid Dinophilus gyrociliatus (Dinophilidae)},
  author={Alexandra Kerbl and Jos{\'e} Mar{\'i}a Mart{\'i}n-Dur{\'a}n and Katrine Worsaae and Andreas Hejnol},
  journal={EvoDevo},
  year={2016},
  volume={7}
}
BackgroundAnnelida is a morphologically diverse animal group that exhibits a remarkable variety in nervous system architecture (e.g., number and location of longitudinal cords, architecture of the brain). Despite this heterogeneity of neural arrangements, the molecular profiles related to central nervous system patterning seem to be conserved even between distantly related annelids. In particular, comparative molecular studies on brain and anterior neural region patterning genes have focused so… 

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The decode of the compact 73.8 Mb genome of Dimorphilus gyrociliatus, a meiobenthic segmented worm, reveals a conservative route to genome compaction in annelids, reminiscent of that observed in the vertebrate Takifugu rubripes.
Conservative route to genome compaction in a miniature annelid
TLDR
The decode of the compact 73.8-megabase genome of Dimorphilus gyrociliatus, a meiobenthic segmented worm, reveals a conservative route to genome compaction in annelids, reminiscent of that observed in the vertebrate Takifugu rubripes.
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