Molecular phylogeny of fig wasps Agaonidae are not monophyletic.

@article{Rasplus1998MolecularPO,
  title={Molecular phylogeny of fig wasps Agaonidae are not monophyletic.},
  author={Jean‐Yves Rasplus and Carole Kerdelhu{\'e} and Isabelle Le Clainche and G. Mondor},
  journal={Comptes rendus de l'Academie des sciences. Serie III, Sciences de la vie},
  year={1998},
  volume={321 6},
  pages={
          517-26
        }
}
Chromosome numbers are not fixed in Agaonidae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea)
TLDR
The variation in chromosome numbers that the analysis of three Ceratosolen species suggests that karyology can usefully complement molecular-based studies of the phylogeny of fig wasps.
A Multilocus Phylogeny of the World Sycoecinae Fig Wasps (Chalcidoidea: Pteromalidae)
TLDR
The authors' analyses revealed several cases of probable speciation on the same host trees, which raises the question of how resource partitioning occurs to avoid competitive exclusion, and proposed a new classification for the Sycoecinae.
Molecular phylogenies of fig wasps: partial cocladogenesis of pollinators and parasites.
TLDR
It is argued that host plant switching is likely to be less constrained for Sycoscapter parasites than for Pleistodontes pollinators, and there is not perfect congruence of pollinator and parasite phylogenies.
A living fossil Tetrapus fig wasp (Hymenoptera: Agaoninae) developing in extant Neotropical fig species (Moraceae: Ficus, section Pharmacosycea).
TLDR
This work reports a group of New World extant Tetrapus morphotypes, whose females have two mandibular appendages and the males are hexapodous, their fig host association and phylogenetic position to the family Agaonidae, and suggests that Hexapus stands up as a living fossil and the sister clade of Tetrapu s.s.
Patterns of diversification of Afrotropical Otiteselline fig waSPS: phylogenetic study reveals a double radiation across host figs and conservatism of host association
TLDR
The results suggest that Otiteselline wasp speciation is largely constrained by the diversification of their hosts, and a difference in ovipositor length between the two Otiteslline species coexisting in the same Ficus species, which probably corresponds to ecological differences.
Phylogenetic relationships, historical biogeography and character evolution of fig-pollinating wasps
TLDR
The fig–wasp mutualism exhibits extraordinarily long–term evolutionary stability despite clearly identifiable conflicts of interest between the interactors, which is reflected by the very distinct variations found on the basic mutualistic theme.
A new species of high mountain Andean fig wasp (Hymenoptera: Agaonidae) with a detailed description of its life cycle
TLDR
A new species of fig wasp is described, Pegoscapus bacataensis, pollinator of the Andean fig tree, Ficus andicola; as well as providing the first detailed description of the Fig wasp life cycle.
A molecular phylogeny of the Trichogrammatidae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea), with an evaluation of the utility of their male genitalia for higher level classification
TLDR
The molecular results suggest that Trichogrammatidae primitively parasitized Coleoptera, with more recent radiations onto other insect orders, such as Lepidoptera and Hemiptera, while the structure of the male genitalia does correspond with relative taxon position in the molecular hypotheses.
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TLDR
Nucleotide sequence data is used to address a series of questions concerning genealogical associations, host specificities and degree of strict-sense co-evolution exhibited by members of these groups of wasps and found that all pollinators formed a clear monophyletic group.
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The family is subdivided into the two subfamilies Agaoninae and Blastophaginae, and one complex is formed by some species hitherto classified with Blastophaga, but does not seem to exist at a higher level.
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TLDR
It is shown that the wasps belonging to the most abundant genus of New World parasites, the Idarnes wasps, develop at the expense of the pollinating wasps and not the viable seeds, suggesting an explanation for the stability of the fig-fig-pollinating wasp mutualism, as well as the structure of its parasite community.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is argued first that this pattern of abortion will be selected during a sustained period of heavy wasp infestation because seeds will then become scarce relative to pollen-carrying wasps, and increased expenditure by the fig on seed production would therefore be favoured by natural selection.
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TLDR
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