Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions identify East Asia as the cradle for the evolution of the cosmopolitan genus Myotis (Mammalia, Chiroptera).

@article{Ruedi2013MolecularPR,
  title={Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions identify East Asia as the cradle for the evolution of the cosmopolitan genus Myotis (Mammalia, Chiroptera).},
  author={M. Ruedi and B. Stadelmann and Y. Gager and E. Douzery and C. Francis and Liang-kong Lin and Antonio Guill{\'e}n-Servent and A. Cibois},
  journal={Molecular phylogenetics and evolution},
  year={2013},
  volume={69 3},
  pages={
          437-49
        }
}
Sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (1140 bp) and nuclear Rag 2 (1148 bp) genes were used to assess the evolutionary history of the cosmopolitan bat genus Myotis, based on a worldwide sampling of over 88 named species plus 7 species with uncertain nomenclature. Phylogenetic reconstructions of this comprehensive taxon sampling show that most radiation of species occurred independently within each biogeographic region. Our molecular study supports an early divergence of species from the… Expand
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