Molecular phylogenetic evidence for a mimetic radiation in Peruvian poison frogs supports a Müllerian mimicry hypothesis

@article{Symula2001MolecularPE,
  title={Molecular phylogenetic evidence for a mimetic radiation in Peruvian poison frogs supports a M{\"u}llerian mimicry hypothesis},
  author={Rebecca E. Symula and Rainer Schulte and Kyle Summers},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2001},
  volume={268},
  pages={2415 - 2421}
}
Examples of Müllerian mimicry, in which resemblance between unpalatable species confers mutual benefit, are rare in vertebrates. Strong comparative evidence for mimicry is found when the colour and pattern of a single species closely resemble several different model species simultaneously in different geographical regions. Todemonstrate this, it is necessary to provide compelling evidence that the putative mimics do, in fact, form a monophyletic group. We present molecular phylogenetic evidence… Expand
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