Molecular mimicry and immune‐mediated diseases

@article{Oldstone1998MolecularMA,
  title={Molecular mimicry and immune‐mediated diseases},
  author={Michael B. A. Oldstone},
  journal={The FASEB Journal},
  year={1998},
  volume={12},
  pages={1255 - 1265}
}
  • M. Oldstone
  • Published 1 October 1998
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The FASEB Journal
Molecular mimicry has been proposed as a pathogenetic mechanism for autoimmune disease, as well as a probe useful in uncovering its etiologic agents. The hypothesis is based in part on the abundant epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence of an association of infectious agents with autoimmune disease and observed cross‐reactivity of immune reagents with host ‘self’ antigens and microbial determinants. For our purpose, molecular mimicry is defined as similar structures shared by… 

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Infection, mimics, and autoimmune disease.

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  • 2001
TLDR
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...

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