Molecular mechanisms underlying formation of long-term reward memories and extinction memories in the honeybee (Apis mellifera).

Abstract

The honeybee (Apis mellifera) has long served as an invertebrate model organism for reward learning and memory research. Its capacity for learning and memory formation is rooted in the ecological need to efficiently collect nectar and pollen during summer to ensure survival of the hive during winter. Foraging bees learn to associate a flower's characteristic features with a reward in a way that resembles olfactory appetitive classical conditioning, a learning paradigm that is used to study mechanisms underlying learning and memory formation in the honeybee. Due to a plethora of studies on appetitive classical conditioning and phenomena related to it, the honeybee is one of the best characterized invertebrate model organisms from a learning psychological point of view. Moreover, classical conditioning and associated behavioral phenomena are surprisingly similar in honeybees and vertebrates, suggesting a convergence of underlying neuronal processes, including the molecular mechanisms that contribute to them. Here I review current thinking on the molecular mechanisms underlying long-term memory (LTM) formation in honeybees following classical conditioning and extinction, demonstrating that an in-depth analysis of the molecular mechanisms of classical conditioning in honeybees might add to our understanding of associative learning in honeybees and vertebrates.

DOI: 10.1101/lm.033118.113

Cite this paper

@article{Eisenhardt2014MolecularMU, title={Molecular mechanisms underlying formation of long-term reward memories and extinction memories in the honeybee (Apis mellifera).}, author={Dorothea Eisenhardt}, journal={Learning & memory}, year={2014}, volume={21 10}, pages={534-42} }