Molecular genetics of the most endangered canid: the Ethiopian wolf Canis simensis

@article{Gottelli1994MolecularGO,
  title={Molecular genetics of the most endangered canid: the Ethiopian wolf Canis simensis},
  author={Dada Gottelli and C. Sillero‐Zubiri and G Applebaum and Michael S. Roy and Derek J Girman and Jaime Garc{\'i}a-Moreno and Elaine A. Ostrander and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={1994},
  volume={3}
}
The world's most endangered canid is the Ethiopian wolf Canis simensis, which is found in six isolated areas of the Ethiopian highlands with a total population of no more than 500 individuals. Ethiopian wolf populations are declining due to habitat loss and extermination by humans. Moreover, in at least one population, Ethiopian wolves are sympatric with domestic dogs, which may hybridize with them, compete for food, and act as disease vectors. Using molecular techniques, we address four… 
Genetic variation and parentage in the Ethiopian wolf Canis simensis
TLDR
The results of this study contribute to the understanding of the social system of the Ethiopian wolf, document the consequence of disease outbreaks to pack structure, and should be useful to devise future in-situ management plans towards stabilising the existing amount of genetic variation.
Major histocompatibility complex diversity in the endangered Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis).
TLDR
Ethiopian wolves probably have an adequate amount of MHC variation to ensure the survival of the species, but this study sampled only the largest Ethiopian wolf population in Bale, and did not take the smaller populations further north into consideration.
Behaviour and ecology of the Ethiopian wolf ( Canis simensis ) in a human-dominated landscape outside protected areas
The Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis) is a very rare, endangered, endemic species surviving in isolated mountain pockets in the Ethiopian highlands, with nearly 50% of the global population living
The African wolf is a missing link in the wolf-like canid phylogeny
TLDR
The first genomic data for the African wolf is presented and it is demonstrated that it is a unique taxon and not a hybrid between other canids, indicating that the distribution of the golden jackal needs to be re-evaluated and point towards alternative hypotheses for the evolution of the rare and endemic Ethiopian wolf.
Population genetics of the African wolf (Canis lupaster) across its range: first evidence of hybridization with domestic dogs in Africa
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The results provide evidence that the genome of the African wolf is still subject to admixture with C. lupaster, which could lead to the genetic dilution of endemic African wolf lineages, such as in eastern Africa, but may also imply disease prevalence and competition for resources with domestic dogs.
Threatened Ethiopian wolves persist in small isolated Afroalpine enclaves
The Ethiopian wolf Canis simensis is endemic to the Afroalpine highlands of Ethiopia. Half of the world population, estimated at c. 500 individuals, lives in the Bale Mountains of southern Ethiopia.
Ancient origin and evolution of the Indian wolf: evidence from mitochondrial DNA typing of wolves from Trans-Himalayan region and Pennisular India
TLDR
The study suggests that Indian subcontinent had been one major center of origin and diversification of the wolf and related canids and highlights the need to revisit the origin, evolution and dispersion of wolf populations in Asia and elsewhere.
Reviving the African Wolf Canis lupus lupaster in North and West Africa: A Mitochondrial Lineage Ranging More than 6,000 km Wide
TLDR
The results suggest that the African wolf is a relatively ancient gray wolf lineage with a fairly large, past effective population size, as also suggested by the Pleistocene fossil record and in terms of conservation, it appears urgent to further characterize the status of the Africanwolf with regard to the African golden jackal.
Helminth parasites in the endangered Ethiopian wolf, Canis simensis
TLDR
Faecal samples collected from 94 wild Ethiopian wolves in the Bale Mountains of southern Ethiopia were screened for the presence of helminth eggs using a semi-quantitative volumetric dilution method with microscopy and associations between presence/absence of Capillaria, Toxocara and Trichuris eggs were found.
Multilocus Detection of Wolf x Dog Hybridization in Italy, and Guidelines for Marker Selection
TLDR
The frequency of F1 and F2 was lower than backcrosses or introgressed individuals, suggesting hybridization already occurred some generations in the past, during early phases of wolf expansion from their historical core areas.
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