Molecular genetic variation across the southern and eastern geographic ranges of the African lion, Panthera leo

@article{Dubach2004MolecularGV,
  title={Molecular genetic variation across the southern and eastern geographic ranges of the African lion, Panthera leo},
  author={John Matthew Dubach and Bruce D. Patterson and Michael B. Briggs and K. Venzke and J. R. B. Flamand and Philip Stander and L. C. Scheepers and Roland Kays},
  journal={Conservation Genetics},
  year={2004},
  volume={6},
  pages={15-24}
}
AbstractWe examined sequence variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 genes (2,360 bp total) for 26 lions from eleven locations throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Six distinct haplotypes were observed in the combined sequences, forming two clades: the eastern and the western savannas. The Uganda-Western Kenya haplotype grouped at a basal position with the eastern clade of lions from Tsavo south to the Transvaal and Natal regions. The phylogenetic position of the… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Mitochondrial Haplotype Diversity in Zambian Lions: Bridging a Gap in the Biogeography of an Iconic Species
TLDR
Analysis of DNA sequence diversity at the 12S to 16S mitochondrial genes of 165 African lions from five main areas in Zambia has uncovered haplotypes which link Southern Africa with East Africa, supporting earlier hypotheses that eastern-southern Africa may represent the evolutionary cradle for the species. Expand
Genetic perspectives on “Lion Conservation Units” in Eastern and Southern Africa
Current understanding of genetic variation in lions (Panthera leo) is inadequate to guide many management decisions necessary for conservation of the species. We studied sequence variation in theExpand
Genetic diversity, evolutionary history and implications for conservation of the lion (Panthera leo) in West and Central Africa
TLDR
The taxonomic division between an African and an Asian subspecies does not fully reflect the overall genetic diversity within lions, and genetically distinct lineages should be prioritized in order to conserve genetic Diversity within the species. Expand
Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa
TLDR
It is suggested that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, and there are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa. Expand
Phylogeographic Patterns in Africa and High Resolution Delineation of Genetic Clades in the Lion (Panthera leo)
TLDR
This study introduces the lion as a model for African phylogeography and supports the revision of current lion taxonomy, as recognition of a northern and a southern subspecies is more parsimonious with the evolutionary history of the lion. Expand
Genetic diversity in the Lion (Panthera leo (Linnaeus 1758): Unravelling the Past and Prospects
TLDR
Phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA data, microsatellites and autosomal SNPs from lion populations throughout their complete geographic range show congruent patterns in which the Asiatic subspecies has a nested position within the West/Central African lion. Expand
Genetic analysis of African lions (Panthera leo) in Zambia support movement across anthropogenic and geographical barriers
TLDR
Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA results from 409 lions are reported that support this population substructure across Zambia but proposes only partial isolation of the Luangwa Valley with more movement between the populations than previously thought. Expand
and implications for conservation of the lion (Panthera leo) in West and Central
Aim In recent decades there has been a marked decline in the numbers of African lions (Panthera leo), especially in West Africa where the species is regionally endangered. Based on the climatologicalExpand
The origin, current diversity and future conservation of the modern lion (Panthera leo)
TLDR
The results suggest that the modern lion may currently consist of three geographic populations on the basis of their recent evolutionary history: North African–Asian, southern African and middle African. Expand
Dual phylogenetic origins of Nigerian lions (Panthera leo)
TLDR
The finding that the two remaining lion populations in Nigeria have different phylogenetic origins is an important aspect to consider in future decisions regarding management and conservation of rapidly shrinking Lion populations in West Africa. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 90 REFERENCES
Patterns of population subdivision, gene flow and genetic variability in the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus)
TLDR
Analysis of mtDNA nucleotide diversity suggests that, historically, wild dog populations have been small relative to other large carnivores, and a large admixture zone spanning populations from Botswana, Zimbabwe and south‐eastern Tanzania is found. Expand
Structure and history of African elephant populations: I. Eastern and southern Africa.
TLDR
Patterns of restriction site variation within mitochondrial DNA of 270 individuals used to examine the current structure of savanna elephant populations and to infer historical patterns of gene flow across eastern and southern Africa are consistent with the more parsimonious hypothesis that gene flow has maintained a sufficiently large effective population size for representatives of clades that diverged at least 4 million years ago to have persisted by chance within a population that was subdivided, but not strictly isolated in allopatry. Expand
MITOCHONDRIAL DNA SEQUENCE DIVERGENCE AMONG BIG CATS AND THEIR HYBRIDS
TLDR
Mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequence analysis of the hair samples from suspected Indian and Siberian tigerhybrids of the Dhudhwa tiger reserve revealed the presence of Indian tiger mitochondrial DNA haplotype. Expand
Conservation genetics of the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis)
TLDR
Phylogenetic relationships between mtDNA haplotypes analyzed using the neighbor joining method reveal that for the small sample available, D. b. Expand
An exceptional case of historical outbreeding in African sable antelope populations
TLDR
Nested clade analysis revealed that past allopatric fragmentation, caused probably by habitat discontinuities associated with the East African Rift Valley system, together with intermediary episodic long‐distance colonization and restricted, recurrent gene flow have played an predominant role in shaping the extent of maternal genetic diversity and population structure. Expand
Phylogeography and conservation of impala and greater kudu
TLDR
Combined analysis of individual lineages, relationships and population genetics suggest a colonization process from Southern Africa toward Eastern regions in the greater kudu and that is a marked divergence of lineages from South‐western Africa relative to other regions. Expand
Phylogeography of the African buffalo based on mitochondrial and Y‐chromosomal loci: Pleistocene origin and population expansion of the Cape buffalo subspecies
TLDR
Population genetics and phylogeography of the African buffalo are inferred from genetic diversity at mitochondrial D‐loop hypervariable region I sequences and a Y‐chromosomal microsatellite and there appears to have been a population expansion from eastern to southern Africa, which may be related to vegetation changes. Expand
Conservation Implications of Genetic Differentiation in Southern African Populations of Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis)
TLDR
The analyzed 30 protein-coding loci of four southern African black rhinoceros populations concluded that one of these populations is of the subspecies Diceros bicornsis bicornis and the other three of Dicero bicORNis minor. Expand
Sequence variation in the mitochondrial DNA control region of wild African cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus)
TLDR
The two central repeat units in cheetah show homogenization that may have arisen by convergent evolution and may have some function in the regulation of control region replication. Expand
Phylogeography of three closely related African bovids (tribe Alcelaphini).
TLDR
A scenario where these antelopes, previously with wide pan-African distributions, became extinct except in a few refugia is suggested, where the hartebeest, and probably also the topi, survived inRefugia north of the equator, in the east and the west, respectively, as well as one in the south. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...