Molecular evolution of calcification genes in morphologically similar but phylogenetically unrelated scleractinian corals.

@article{Wirshing2014MolecularEO,
  title={Molecular evolution of calcification genes in morphologically similar but phylogenetically unrelated scleractinian corals.},
  author={Herman H. Wirshing and Andrew C. Baker},
  journal={Molecular phylogenetics and evolution},
  year={2014},
  volume={77},
  pages={
          281-95
        }
}
  • H. WirshingA. Baker
  • Published 1 August 2014
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Molecular phylogenetics and evolution

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