Molecular evidence for an ancient duplication of the entire yeast genome

@article{Wolfe1997MolecularEF,
  title={Molecular evidence for an ancient duplication of the entire yeast genome},
  author={Kenneth H. Wolfe and Denis C. Shields},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1997},
  volume={387},
  pages={708-713}
}
Gene duplication is an important source of evolutionary novelty,. Most duplications are of just a single gene, but Ohno proposed that whole-genome duplication (polyploidy) is an important evolutionary mechanism. Many duplicate genes have been found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and these often seem to be phenotypically redundant. Here we show that the arrangement of duplicated genes in the S. cerevisiae genome is consistent with Ohno's hypothesis. We propose a model in which this species is a… 
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Extent of genomic rearrangement after genome duplication in yeast.
  • C. Seoighe, K. H. Wolfe
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1998
TLDR
Computer simulation of a model in which 8% of the original genes were retained in duplicate after genome duplication, and 70-100 reciprocal translocations occurred between chromosomes, produced arrangements of duplicated chromosomal regions very similar to the map of real duplications in yeast.
Evolution after genome duplication
TLDR
Kuzmin et al. (1) show that systematic analysis of di- and trigenic genetic interactions in budding yeast can overcome the challenge of eliminating duplicate genes and discover general constraints that influence the retention and divergence of duplicate genes.
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