Molecular ecology and adaptation of visual photopigments in craniates

@article{Davies2012MolecularEA,
  title={Molecular ecology and adaptation of visual photopigments in craniates},
  author={Wayne I L Davies and Shaun P. Collin and David M Hunt},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2012},
  volume={21}
}
In craniates, opsin‐based photopigments expressed in the eye encode molecular ‘light sensors’ that constitute the initial protein in photoreception and the activation of the phototransduction cascade. Since the cloning and sequencing of the first vertebrate opsin gene (bovine rod opsin) nearly 30 years ago (Ovchinnikov Yu 1982, FEBS Letters, 148, 179–191; Hargrave et al. 1983, Biophysics of Structure & Mechanism, 9, 235–244; Nathans & Hogness 1983, Cell, 34, 807–814), it is now well established… Expand
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