Molecular analysis of Neanderthal DNA from the northern Caucasus

@article{Ovchinnikov2000MolecularAO,
  title={Molecular analysis of Neanderthal DNA from the northern Caucasus},
  author={Igor V. Ovchinnikov and Anders G{\"o}therstr{\"o}m and Galina P. Romanova and Vitaliy M. Kharitonov and Kerstin Lid{\'e}n and William Goodwin},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2000},
  volume={404},
  pages={490-493}
}
The expansion of premodern humans into western and eastern Europe ∼40,000 years before the present led to the eventual replacement of the Neanderthals by modern humans ∼28,000 years ago. Here we report the second mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis of a Neanderthal, and the first such analysis on clearly dated Neanderthal remains. The specimen is from one of the eastern-most Neanderthal populations, recovered from Mezmaiskaya Cave in the northern Caucasus. Radiocarbon dating estimated the… Expand
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Neanderthals
  • K. Harvati
  • Encyclopedic Dictionary of Archaeology
  • 2021
Neanderthals are a group of fossil humans that inhabited Western Eurasia from approximately 300 to 30,000 years ago (ka). They vanished from the fossil record a few millennia after the first modernExpand
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