Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: Molecular Structure of Deoxypentose Nucleic Acids

@article{Wilkins1953MolecularSO,
  title={Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: Molecular Structure of Deoxypentose Nucleic Acids},
  author={M. Wilkins and A. R. Stokes and H. R. Wilson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1953},
  volume={171},
  pages={738-740}
}
M. H. F. Wilkins, A. R. Stokes, H. R. Wilson: Molecular Structure of Deoxypentose Nucleic Acids 

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