Molecular Mechanisms of Cannabinoid Protection from Neuronal Excitotoxicity

@article{Kim2006MolecularMO,
  title={Molecular Mechanisms of Cannabinoid Protection from Neuronal Excitotoxicity},
  author={Sun Hee Kim and Seok Joon Won and Xiao Ou Mao and Kunlin Jin and David A. Greenberg},
  journal={Molecular Pharmacology},
  year={2006},
  volume={69},
  pages={691 - 696}
}
Cannabinoids protect neurons from excitotoxic injury. We investigated the mechanisms involved by studying N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) toxicity in cultured murine cerebrocortical neurons in vitro and mouse cerebral cortex in vivo. The cannabinoid agonist R(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(morpholinyl)-methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-yl]-(1-naphthalenyl)-methanone mesylate [R(+)-Win 55212] reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures treated with 20 μM NMDA, and its protective effect… 

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