Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Virulence Elucidated Using a Pseudomonas aeruginosa– Caenorhabditis elegans Pathogenesis Model

@article{MahajanMiklos1999MolecularMO,
  title={Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Virulence Elucidated Using a Pseudomonas aeruginosa– Caenorhabditis elegans Pathogenesis Model},
  author={Shalina Mahajan-Miklos and Man-Wah Tan and Laurence G. Rahme and Frederick M. Ausubel},
  journal={Cell},
  year={1999},
  volume={96},
  pages={47-56}
}

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