Molecular Mechanism of Metabolic Syndrome X: Contribution of Adipocytokines · Adipocyte‐derived Bioactive Substances

@article{Matsuzawa1999MolecularMO,
  title={Molecular Mechanism of Metabolic Syndrome X: Contribution of Adipocytokines · Adipocyte‐derived Bioactive Substances},
  author={Yuji Matsuzawa and Tohru Funahashi and Tadashi Nakamura},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={1999},
  volume={892}
}
ABSTRACT: Syndrome X is a clinical syndrome in which multiple risks cluster in an individual, and it is a common basis of vascular disease in the industrial countries. The molecular basis of Syndrome X, however, has not been elucidated. We have analyzed body fat distribution using CT scan and have shown that people who have accumulated intra‐abdominal visceral fat frequently have multiple risks and vascular diseases. Thus, “visceral fat syndrome” is a clinical entity compatible with Syndrome X… 
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