Molecular Evolution of Arthropod Color Vision Deduced from Multiple Opsin Genes of Jumping Spiders

@article{Koyanagi2008MolecularEO,
  title={Molecular Evolution of Arthropod Color Vision Deduced from Multiple Opsin Genes of Jumping Spiders},
  author={Mitsumasa Koyanagi and Takashi Nagata and Kazutaka Katoh and Shigeki Yamashita and Fumio Tokunaga},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2008},
  volume={66},
  pages={130-137}
}
Among terrestrial animals, only vertebrates and arthropods possess wavelength-discrimination ability, so-called “color vision”. For color vision to exist, multiple opsins which encode visual pigments sensitive to different wavelengths of light are required. While the molecular evolution of opsins in vertebrates has been well investigated, that in arthropods remains to be elucidated. This is mainly due to poor information about the opsin genes of non-insect arthropods. To obtain an overview of… 
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  • F. Frentiu, A. Briscoe
  • Biology
    BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology
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