Molecular Evidence for the Early Colonization of Land by Fungi and Plants

@article{Heckman2001MolecularEF,
  title={Molecular Evidence for the Early Colonization of Land by Fungi and Plants},
  author={Davin Heckman and David M. Geiser and B R Eidell and Rebecca L Stauffer and N L Kardos and S. Blair Hedges},
  journal={Science},
  year={2001},
  volume={293},
  pages={1129 - 1133}
}
The colonization of land by eukaryotes probably was facilitated by a partnership (symbiosis) between a photosynthesizing organism (phototroph) and a fungus. However, the time when colonization occurred remains speculative. The first fossil land plants and fungi appeared 480 to 460 million years ago (Ma), whereas molecular clock estimates suggest an earlier colonization of land, about 600 Ma. Our protein sequence analyses indicate that green algae and major lineages of fungi were present 1000 Ma… Expand
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