Modulation of short-latency intracortical inhibition in human primary motor cortex during synchronised versus syncopated finger movements

@article{Byblow2005ModulationOS,
  title={Modulation of short-latency intracortical inhibition in human primary motor cortex during synchronised versus syncopated finger movements},
  author={Winston D. Byblow and Cathy M. Stinear},
  journal={Experimental Brain Research},
  year={2005},
  volume={168},
  pages={287-293}
}
Rhythmic movements are inherently more stable and easier to perform when they are synchronised with a periodic stimulus, as opposed to syncopated between the beats of a pacing stimulus. Although this behavioural phenomenon is well documented, its neurophysiological basis is poorly understood. In a first experiment, we demonstrated that all healthy subjects (N=8) performing index finger abduction in time with an auditory metronome exhibited transitions from syncopation to synchronisation when… CONTINUE READING

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